Savages: Silence Yourself (Matador)

 |   |  1 min read

Savages: She Will
Savages: Silence Yourself (Matador)

As often happens -- and we notice this with the advantage of distance -- the British music press sometimes works itself into a lather about some exciting new band. They seem to have over Savages who, undeniably, make some very exciting post-punk indie.rock all over this debut. It is disciplined, passionate, emotionally committed and . . .

And frankly it is 1982 revisited, specifically Sioux and the Banshees with some of the heroic tropes of Echo and the Bunnymen/Teardrop Explodes and the menace of Magazine at their most rowdy.

So I guess in their manifesto on the front cover they are at least keeping to their own code of conduct: "Perhaps when we have deconstructed everything we should be thinking about putting everything back together".

Seems they did, in rather the same order as it was in three decades ago. 

To this however these women also add a powerful feminist muscularity and deliver a seriously threatening sonic punch which demands you play this loud to enjoy the sheer physicality of their sound.

They are apparently quite something to see, made their reputation live before the media hype started flying in earnest and are already being embraced by the art world for their cultural connects.

It'll be interesting to see where all this leads. On the evidence of just this album you'd think it might be taking the present back to the past . . . and a band or art movement with a manifesto is generally making problems for itself a little further down the road.

Interesting (which is a word which suspends judgement, right?) 

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Graham Coxon: The Spinning Top (Transgressive)

Graham Coxon: The Spinning Top (Transgressive)

Damon Albarn has had the more visible profile outside of Blur -- Gorillaz, his Mali Music album, The Good, The Bad and The Queen -- but for the band’s former guitarist Coxon (who left after... > Read more

Greg Graffin: Cold As The Clay (Anti/Shock)

Greg Graffin: Cold As The Clay (Anti/Shock)

Okay, I'll admit it, I've never heard a note by Bad Religion, the band Graffin usually fronts (and which is regularly described as "punk" and had an album entitled Recipe For Hate).... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

NORDIC DESIGN IN MELBOURNE (2015): Birth of the Cool

NORDIC DESIGN IN MELBOURNE (2015): Birth of the Cool

When John Lennon wrote Norwegian Wood in 1965, the song may have alluded to an affair he'd had but the title reference was very specific. It was to the fashionable Scandinavian design of the... > Read more

Eric Bibb: Diamond Days (Telarc/Elite)

Eric Bibb: Diamond Days (Telarc/Elite)

Bibb is one of that new generation of bluesmen who sounds utterly authentic: this despite Bibb growing up in New York, having John Lewis of the Modern Jazz Quartet as an uncle, and studying... > Read more