The Head and the Heart: Let's Be Still (SubPop)

 |   |  <1 min read

The Head and the Heart: 10.000 Weight in Gold
The Head and the Heart: Let's Be Still (SubPop)

Many online music reviews have the tag, “for fans of . . .” so let's cut to that for this musically delightful, thoughtful second album by a Seattle band of mostly out-of-state talents.

This is for fans of Fleet Foxes, Paul Simon, orchestrated pop and finely crafted wistful nostalgia or emotional uncertainty wrapped up in lovely tunes.

With a folk-pop approach and gentle optimism (“the sun still rises, even through the rain”) alongside serious considerations (Homecoming Heroes, Cruel which includes the lines “everywhere I turn there seems to be another war”) this one also balances the male perspectives/voices from Josiah Johnson and Jonathan Russell with the sometimes quirky sound of violinist Charity Rose Thielen (notably on the slightly bent Summertime).

Elsewhere are heartfelt songs (the slightly mysterious Josh McBride), some nudging towards pop-rock (the George Harrison-like Shake) and others sitting on gently shifting piano and violin lines (the aforementioned Cruel which also has the almost apologetic line “I tried being cruel, it's just not in me”).

Much of this sounds like summertime, but there are autumnal moments and even the early chill of winter too.

A slow grower and keeper.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Julian Temple Band: Quiet Earth (Oscillosonic/Yellow Eye)

Julian Temple Band: Quiet Earth (Oscillosonic/Yellow Eye)

Noticed how in action movies so few actors speak these days? They tend use an amplified whisper which has the effect of raising tension -- even when very little is happening. San... > Read more

RECOMMENDED REISSUE: Corben Simpson; Get Up With the Sun

RECOMMENDED REISSUE: Corben Simpson; Get Up With the Sun

Although not a classic New Zealand album -- one which starts with a weird one minute kazoo solo perhaps precludes itself from consideration immediately -- this '73 release on the Harvest label by... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Magazine: Real Life (1978)

Magazine: Real Life (1978)

If there was a godfather of the Manchester scene in the Eighties there's a good case to be made that it wasn't Tony Wilson (who founded the Hacienda and Factory Records) but that it was Howard... > Read more

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . CARL T SPRAGUE: At home on the range in the Eighteen Seventies

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . CARL T SPRAGUE: At home on the range in the Eighteen Seventies

Some musicians are so close to the source they are almost part of it. The young Rolling Stones -- despite their cultural, emotional and physical distance from American blues – heard... > Read more