The Sleepy Jackson: Personality (EMI)

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The Sleepy Jackson: Devil Was In My Yard
The Sleepy Jackson: Personality (EMI)

I was surprised that this ambitious neo-psychedelic pop album -- which has been winning huge praise in the UK -- wasn't heftily reviewed here, especially since the visionary behind it (who has drawn comparisons with Brian Wilson) is a former Kiwi now based in Perth, Luke Steele.

So let's bring this one to your attention: a lushly produced, sonic kaleidoscope which is Beatlesque in parts (from their pre-Pepper/Strawberry Fields period -- and a bit of George Harrison's expansive My Sweet Lord days), it evokes the Flaming Lips and a baroque orchestra in equal measure, and has an astral power-pop quality in widescreen melodies which soar.

Steele doesn't think like anybody else, but he dreams large. And wraps you up in this like a thick warm quilt then carries you across the rooftops.

Headphones and a bit of what you fancy here, I think.

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