Langoth: Grounding (Border)

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Langoth: Grounding (Border)

My understanding is this: that the mainman here is Austrian producer Michael Langoth who invites musician friends around for Friday dinner and recording sessions, and supplies exotic ingredients to both.

For example on this very groove-orientated downbeat album he plays the "gummophon" which consists of a rubber glove, a cardboard tube and some string. (Suspend disbelief folks, the track of the same name is pretty terrific). But mostly these are chilled-out, keyboard-driven tracks, with samples and beats, some gritty vocals by Da Fonz in a couple of places, squirreling saxophone, soft strings, seductive singing by some lady friends . . . and the album comes with a DVD of the natty title-track video, an interview, and Langoth on turntables and frypans.

Very cool all round.

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