George Johnston: Interpolation (digital outlets)

 |   |  1 min read

George Johnston: Interpolation (digital outlets)

Presenting emotionally still and centred music into an atmosphere which keeps the listener's attention isn't quite as easy as it seems.

As those who start on a course of mantra meditation will attest, with the best will in the world the concentration can roam and you need to gently nudge yourself back to the mantra to refocus on something unattached to the world which can so easily seduce.

This album by Wellington's keyboard player George Johnstone charts a mostly quiet and mindful course over 10 pieces in 30 minutes from the warm repetition of the spacious opener Moonlight to the brief Anything is Possible which acts as a not dissimilar bookend inviting you to loop back the start.

The non-referential electronic sounds allow for a kind of detached experience where titles (Awe, New Pattern, Breaking Through et al) are signifiers more than signposts in how to hear a piece.

Perhaps Hope is the most significant as a suggestion however because there is an encompassing positive feeling here – no sense of the cold weightlessness of deep space so common in ambient music – and Breaking Through is well placed at the midpoint as it opens with some subtle dramatics to pull the listener out of a reverie.

The sub-aquatic sound of Tangaroa which follows is mesmerising.

A modest collection which can be as functionally focussing as it is an aural environment constantly arriving and fading.

.

You can hear and buy this album on bandcamp here



Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

The Whitest Boy Alive: Rules (Rhythmethod)

The Whitest Boy Alive: Rules (Rhythmethod)

This former-electronica outfit made an appearance at Elsewhere about three years ago with their impressive debut album Dreams which found them putting aside the bleep-machines and picking up real... > Read more

Various Artists: Black America Sings Bacharach and David (Ace/Border)

Various Artists: Black America Sings Bacharach and David (Ace/Border)

It's one the great ironies that Hal David's name is less familiar today than that of his most famous writing partner Burt Bacharach. It sometimes seems that the shorthand of pop speaks about... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

UTOPIA AVENUE by DAVID MITCHELL

UTOPIA AVENUE by DAVID MITCHELL

Around the midpoint of this 560 page doorstop by the acclaimed writer David Mitchell, anyone who has a loose working knowledge of how Sixties pop and rock bands like the Beatles, Stones, Who and... > Read more

SHEZ RAJA PROFILED (2011): Jazz with a world view

SHEZ RAJA PROFILED (2011): Jazz with a world view

British jazz bassist Shez Raja confounds expectation in the best possible way. A scan of reviews and comments in the British press for the Shez Raja Collective (which included saxophonist Andy... > Read more