The Magic Numbers: Those The Brokes (EMI)

 |   |  <1 min read

The Magic Numbers: Those The Brokes (EMI)

Regular readers of Elsewhere music pages will know my long and abiding love for pop music, and this band is one of my favourites for two reasons: their debut album sparkled with memorable pop melodies, and when they played at the Big Day Out they came on stage smiling and waving.

They looked real happy to be there, and that attitude was infectious. This follow-up to that impressive, self-titled debut (which you really should also buy for summer, believe me) is much more ambitious and they let out their inner Brian Wilson in a couple of places where string arrangements and layers of voices charm effortlessly.

That makes this a less immediately accessible album, but one also the richer for it. There are pop hits here (if radio played pure pop anymore) but I'd expect reviewers to be a little down on this one because it doesn't simply repeat the winning formula.

There are more touches of blue-eyed soul this time out also. If you smiled back at this hairy bunch at the BDO you'll be smiling again when you sit in the garden with a cool drink and this pulsating away in the background.  

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Steve Earle and the Dukes: Terraplane (New West/Warners)

Steve Earle and the Dukes: Terraplane (New West/Warners)

The only surprising thing about Earle making a blues album – given he's done rock, country, folk and bluegrass – is that it took him so long. As a Texan where the tough electric... > Read more

The Dead C:  Secret Earth (Ba Da Bing)

The Dead C: Secret Earth (Ba Da Bing)

Let it be said immediately The Dead C out of Port Chalmers are a taste that few have acquired: dense, often lo-fi guitar landscapes of scouring sound, feedback and distortion probably don't make it... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . THE MONKS: Gabba Gabba Hey Hey we're the Monks

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . THE MONKS: Gabba Gabba Hey Hey we're the Monks

Because of its lo-fi, raw and untutored quality, the Black Monk Time album by a group of five former GIs who had been stationed in Germany in the early Sixties has been widely hailed by the likes... > Read more

Ustad Dildar Hussain Khan: Sur Sangeet (Kanaga)

Ustad Dildar Hussain Khan: Sur Sangeet (Kanaga)

At any Womad one of the most transcendental and transporting musical events is when singers of the Sufi qawwali tradition appear. Usually fronting a large group of supportive singers and... > Read more