THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE REGGAE QUESTIONNAIRE: A-Kel of Tomorrow People

 |   |  2 min read

Tomorrow People: Souljah Feeling
THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE REGGAE QUESTIONNAIRE: A-Kel of Tomorrow People

They began life as a studio project . . . but the Wellington collective that is Tomorrow People quickly became a proper band, and one which took their name from the Ziggy Marley song and are unashamedly purveyors of "sunshine reggae".

Which might just mean one-drop for barbecues in Aotearoa.

They are certainly firmly within a soulful, consciousness tradition as evidenced on their 2012 album One and their most recent One.5 EP (on which Tyna from Dubious Brothers guests).

So they have certainly earned their place at the upcoming Raggamuffin Festival (see poster) and the summershine grooves -- which also include nods to lover's rock alongside easy skanking and laidback songs - should set the mood for the day.

Time then for band member Avina Kelekolio aka A-Kel to answer our Famous Elsewhere Questionnairte . . .

The first piece of music which really affected you was . . .

The Nineties R&B era

raggamuffin1Your first role models in music were . . .

Bob Marley, Toots and the Maytals, UB40, Michael Jackson

Lennon or Jagger, Bob Marley or Burning Spear, dancehall or raggamuffin, Michael Jackson or Jay-Z?

Lennon, Bob, Raggamuffin, Both Michael and Jay

If music was denied you, your other career choice would be . . .

Whatever Donald Trump does

The three songs (yours, or by others) you would love everyone to hear are . . .

If they were our songs, it would be Better Place, Feel Alright & Souljah Feeling

Any interesting, valuable or just plain strange musical memorabilia at home?

I’ve got my dad's old Toots and the Maytals LP record, that I managed to get signed by the band themselves!

The best book on reggae music or reggae musicians you have read is . . .

Haven’t read any to be honest… a lot of Wikipedia-ing though

If you could get on stage with anyone it would be . . . (And you would play?)

Alive, it would be Ali Campbell… he basically sang my childhood.

The three films you'd insist anybody watch because they might understand you better are . . .

Snatch, Usual Suspects, Anchorman

The last CD or vinyl album you bought was . . . (And your most recent downloads include . . .)

Last physical CD was Universal Love by Sons of Zion. Most recently downloaded album is ‘X’ by Ed Sheeran.

One song, royalties for life, never have to work again. The song by anyone, yourself included, which wouldn't embarrass you would be . . .

Hmmm, don’t really understand this question. Lol

image-0-150-0-150_3The poster, album cover or piece of art could you live with on your bedroom forever would be . . .

I really liked MJ’s Dangerous album cover

You are allowed just one reggae box set, and it is . . .

UB40 Labour of Love

David Bowie sang, “Five years, that's all we've got . . .” You would spend them where, doing . . .?

Probably in Europe or the Caribbean somewhere, touring and holidaying

And finally, in the nature of press conferences in Japan, “Can you tell me please why this is your best album ever?”

Because we released 95% of the album as singles   :)

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   The Famous Elsewhere Questionnaire articles index

THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE QUESTIONNAIRE: Eddie Rayner

THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE QUESTIONNAIRE: Eddie Rayner

For the briefest moment Elsewhere considered adding "of Split Enz" after Eddie Rayner's name at the top. But that goes without saying and, in many ways, is far too limiting. Since the... > Read more

THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE QUESTIONNAIRE: Ross Mullins

THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE QUESTIONNAIRE: Ross Mullins

It has been more than a wee while – he says 17 years in the liner notes to his current album – since we have heard new music from Ross Mullins, once the unofficial... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Eric Dolphy: Out to Lunch (1964)

Eric Dolphy: Out to Lunch (1964)

The sudden and unexpected death of saxophonist/flute player and clarinettist Eric Dolphy just months after these exceptional studio sessions for the Blue Note label robbed jazz of one of its most... > Read more

Norman "Hurricane" Smith: Oh Babe, What Would You Say (1972)

Norman "Hurricane" Smith: Oh Babe, What Would You Say (1972)

Norman Smith was an unlikely chart-topper when he knocked Elton John off the top of the US charts with this, his second single: he was 49 at the time and prior to that his career had been firmly on... > Read more