Uxia: Eterno Navegar (Harmonia Mundi)

 |   |  <1 min read

Uxia: Morna Sentida
Uxia: Eterno Navegar (Harmonia Mundi)

Uxia is a Portuguese singer and songwriter whose reach goes way beyond the now-familiar fado and into slinky Latin-flavoured material, some European folk of the kind which includes the tradition which links Galacia, the Middle East and the Celtic worlds, and here she allows for soft piano ballads as much as hip-shimmy arrangements.

In the beautifully packaged booklet which comes with this hardback-style album there are brief notes in English in which she says this album was a (metaphorical) voyage for her as she assimilated music from many traditions and had producer Paulo Borges (from the Azores) and other musicians help shape the music.

However it came about it is certainly impressive, even if Portuguese isn't one of your languages. 

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   World Music articles index

SERGIO MENDES INTERVIEWED (2006): The return of the cool and the kitsch

SERGIO MENDES INTERVIEWED (2006): The return of the cool and the kitsch

If you need further proof that you should go through your parents‘ and grandparents‘ old records it’s the current revival of Sixties hitmaker Sergio Mendes. The pop career of... > Read more

Debashish Bhattacharya / Bob Brozman: Mahima (Riverboat)

Debashish Bhattacharya / Bob Brozman: Mahima (Riverboat)

American guitarist and raconteur Brozman was one of the unexpected delights at the 2003 Womad, where he appeared with Takashi Hirayasu playing Okinawan folk songs which they took off into the... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Ennio Morricone: Crime and Dissonance (2005)

Ennio Morricone: Crime and Dissonance (2005)

The great Italian composer, arranger and conductor Ennio Morricone will be 88 later this year, but he is still as productive as ever. And in February he conducted a concert of his music at... > Read more

LED ZEPPELIN REVISITED, PART ONE (2014): How many more times?

LED ZEPPELIN REVISITED, PART ONE (2014): How many more times?

He may have been grumpy, sometimes racist and often on the wrong side of history when it came to the directions of jazz, but the writer and sometime jazz critic Philip Larkin could still make... > Read more