THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE WORLD MUSIC QUESTIONNAIRE: Koady Chaisson of the East Pointers

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Work That Way
THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE WORLD MUSIC QUESTIONNAIRE: Koady Chaisson of the East Pointers

Although Womad festivals always deliver the unexpected – the great act you'd previously never heard of let alone heard – it is possible to make a few predictions, like the African acts will have people up dancing and . . .

That in 2017 the East Pointers out of Canada will be extremely popular.

The folk trio of guitar, fiddle and banjo offer their own take on Celtic music and it can involve boot-stompin' energy.

They have toured widely and to great acclaim so it with pleasure we let former lobster fisherman and banjo player in the band Koady Chaisson (seventh generation musician from Prince Edward Island) the chance to answer our specially designed world music questionnaire . . .

The first musician whose music really affected you was . . .

My older brother JJ, who plays guitar and fiddle. He’s still one of the most incredible musicians I’ve come across.

Your first appearance on stage before an audience was . . . (And you were how old?)

My first appearance was step dancing at the Rollo Bay Fiddle Festival - the festival my family still runs - on Prince Edward Island in 1989. I was 5 years old and didn’t have a clue what I was doing, but I was doing it enthusiastically.

If music was denied you, your other career choice would be . . .

Oh dear. Probably something in the environmental defence realm. I have a biology degree that I haven’t really done much with, perhaps I could put it to good use.

The three songs (yours, or by others) you would love everyone to hear because they are so emotionally moving are . . .

Shyloh’s Song by Gene MacLellan

Aille’s Arabesque by Donal O’Connor and John McSherry

Porch Light by Aoife O’Donovan

The most unusual place you have performed would be . . .?

An eerie old abandoned town just outside Queenstown, Western Tasmania as part of the Festival of Small Halls, Australia.

The most important book you have read is . . .? And why?

“Oh, the Places You’ll Go” by Dr. Seuss. Why? Because it sums life up pretty accurately!

If you could get on stage with anyone it would be . . . (And you would play?)

Gerry O’Connor. He’s a tenor banjo legend from Ireland. If I could pick any tune to play with him it would be Funk the Cajon Blues from his Time to Time album… It’s so wonderful.

The three films you'd like anybody watch because they might understand you better are . . .

Click, Dumb and Dumber and It’s a Wonderful Life

The last CD, vinyl album or download you bought was . . .

Gordon Lightfoot - Greatest Hits on vinyl. That man is a Canadian treasure!

When you travel, what is it you most miss about your home country?

I miss playing music with my family. My nieces and nephews are just starting to get to the age where they are learning how to play. It’s hard to watch that happen from the road.

The artist you most admire would be . . .

James Taylor. From everything I hear about the man he’s a real class act, even after being in the game for so many years. He’s definitely someone to look up to.

Your favourite meal to share with friends would be . . .? (Care to share a simple recipe?)

Turkish bread and vegemite. Make it a meal by adding avocado. I’m not much of a cook, if you couldn’t tell.

Do you practice every day, and if so for how long?

I try to practice as much as possible. We’ve been on the road consistently for the last 15 months so sometimes the only practice I can get in is playing an actual gig. It’s better than nothing though, I guess. I’ve got some time off in Australia right now and I’m looking forward to … scales.

David Bowie sang, “Five years, that's all we've got . . .” If that were true, you would spend them where, doing . . .?

Probably wouldn’t change too much, to be honest. I get to live out my childhood dream everyday. I get to see so many inspiring and beautiful places and meet amazing people through music. It doesn’t get much better than that.

And finally, do you have any unrealised goals in music?

Absolutely. I don’t know that I would ever like to feel finished in this business. There’s always so much to learn and so many places to visit and play. I hope we’re really only just getting started.

.

For details on Womad artists and booking information go here

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