Nuru Kane: Sigil (Riverboat)

 |   |  <1 min read

Nuru Kane: Colere
Nuru Kane: Sigil (Riverboat)

Raised in Dakar, Kane often sounds like a Mississippi bluesman in the solo tracks here.

At other times with his small band he bridges North Africa with trancelike music not dissimilar to that of the Gnawa of Morocco then looping back to his birthplace and Senegalese music.

Quite the world citizen, he lived in Paris in the late 90s, played at Mali's famous Festival in the Desert in 2004 with his band, and recorded this album at the improbably named Mouthmusic Chip Shop in Scotland.

When he sings of slavery and colonisation there is a deep yearning in his voice, but in other places there is a joyous and uplifting quality.

And everywhere the instrumentation -- from resonant three stringed bass, scraping violin, oud, guitars and accordion -- is beguiling.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   World Music articles index

The Benka Boradovsky Bordello Band: Polkapocalypse (Monkey)

The Benka Boradovsky Bordello Band: Polkapocalypse (Monkey)

The problem with playing certain kinds of folk music -- Jewish klezmer, polka and gypsy music come to mind -- is that it can too easily fall into the area of parody and ridicule, albeit... > Read more

Victor Ghannam and Jacco Muller: Palace of Dreams

Victor Ghannam and Jacco Muller: Palace of Dreams

Regrettably like the proverbial curate's egg, this is good in parts. But then again, too few to mention.  Following their Viento del Desierto collaboration in 2009, Dutch flamenco... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

WOMAD ARTIST 2013; JIMMY CLIFF INTERVIEWED: The outsider

WOMAD ARTIST 2013; JIMMY CLIFF INTERVIEWED: The outsider

Jimmy Cliff – who cut such classic reggae singles as The Harder They Come, Many Rivers to Cross and You Can Get It If You Really Want It back in the Sixties and Seventies – says he... > Read more

Peter Brotzmann; Silo Park, Auckland. May 3, 2014

Peter Brotzmann; Silo Park, Auckland. May 3, 2014

There were a couple of key junction points where jazz parted company with its broad audience. The first came when it uncoupled itself from dance music in the post-war period and by the Fifties... > Read more