Age of Consent: Fight Back Rap (1983)

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Age of Consent: Fight Back Rap (1983)

Who said the gay power movement lacked humour? Quite the opposite in fact, and humour is a powerful weapon.

This one-off appeared on the Harvey Kubernick-curated double album English as a Second Language in 1983 on Freeway Records, another in his series of recordings of poets and spoken word artists from LA which included people like Jeffrey Lee Pierce, Wanda Coleman, Henry Rollins, Charles Bukowski, Dave Alvin, Susanna Hoffs, Kim Fowley, Exene Cervenka . . .

As far as I can tell Age of Consent were John Callahan and David Hughes who here ridiculed the codes and conventions of the gay scene . . . but also raised a fist. 

This is lifted from vinyl so there will be surface noise and the odd pop, but the song is worth it. For more on-offs or songs with an interesting back-story see From the Vaults.

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