Joe Tex: I Gotcha (1972)

 |   |  <1 min read

Joe Tex: I Gotcha (1972)

You could never say Joe Tex didn't live an interesting life, if being shot at by James Brown (who said Tex was copying his moves) constitutes something "interesting".

Things weren't always quite so high profile and dangerous, none of his singles in his first decade caught the public's imagination but in the mid Sixties (after Brown had covered his Baby You're Right) he started to score radio play with singles like Skinny Legs And All and Ain't Gonna Bump No More With No Big Fat Woman (in '77).

His biggest hit however was this one, I Gotcha which topped the US r'n'b charts and went to number two on the main chart.

At times you can hear why Brown might have reached for his gun, Tex's yelps and screams (admittedly fairly standard in funked up soul) are very much in the manner of the Godfather of Soul.

Curiously after its success Tex retired from music -- although he made a return three years later and nailed another one away with the disco-friendly Big Fat Woman.

Then he retired properly to his ranch and devoted himself to the Muslim faith he had adopted in the mid Sixties. Tex died five years later in '82. He was 49. 

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory use the RSS feed for daily updates, and check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

 

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

The Beatles: Old Brown Shoe (1969)

The Beatles: Old Brown Shoe (1969)

Although there's probably no such thing as an obscure Beatles' song, this one by George Harrison comes pretty close. It was the b-side to Lennon's Ballad of John and Yoko, and made it onto the... > Read more

King Kurlee feat. Blackmore Jr: Smoke on the Water (1991)

King Kurlee feat. Blackmore Jr: Smoke on the Water (1991)

The merging of hip-hop and rock (via Run DMC with Aerosmith, Anthrax with Public Enemy, and others) lead to nu-metal and its many unfortunate bands such as Limp Bizkit. But, as with the early... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Mamadou Diabate: Courage (World Village)

Mamadou Diabate: Courage (World Village)

As the son of kora player N'fa Diabate who was a founder of the Instrumental Ensemble of Mali and with the great Toumani Diabate as a cousin, Mamadou was born to play the kora. For this, his... > Read more

Peter Brotzmann; Silo Park, Auckland. May 3, 2014

Peter Brotzmann; Silo Park, Auckland. May 3, 2014

There were a couple of key junction points where jazz parted company with its broad audience. The first came when it uncoupled itself from dance music in the post-war period and by the Fifties... > Read more