Elsewhere Art . . . Jeff Healey

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Elsewhere Art . . . Jeff Healey

Blues singer- guitarist Jeff Healey -- who died in 2008 -- was a great collector of 78rpm records.

When Elsewhere interviewed him in the early 2000s he spoke about the 11,000 he had at home (he'd just bought another 30 or 40 in a nearby store) and so evoking that old time music and look just seemed a bit obvious for this collage.

He also loved Dixieland and so there had to be a violinist, who many will recognise.

Healey was a smart guy and it was a terrific conversation. He seemed pleased to talk about the old music and his career, and that I didn't mention the obvious.

He even laughed when I asked him the dumbest question he'd had from a journalist: "What's it like to be blind?"

A great player who seems to have disappeared into history.

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For other Art by Elsewhere go here.

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