Ronnie Earl and the Broadcasters: Spread the Love (Stony Plain)

 |   |  <1 min read

Ronnie Earl: Chitlins Con Carne
Ronnie Earl and the Broadcasters: Spread the Love (Stony Plain)

Blues guitarist Earl opens this typically free-wheeling, jazz-inflected instrumental album with a swinging treatment of Albert Collins' burning Backstroke -- then gets into a low mood on Blues For Dr Donna before the Hammond organ of Dave Limina kicks in for the sultry, midnight groove of Chitlins Con Carne . . . and we away go on another enjoyable ride where the spirits of Jimmy Smith and Otis Spann are as evident as those of Roy Buchanan (that troubled holy drinker) or the early Allman Brothers

Earl is a blues guitarist who long ago learned the emotional power of restraint -- he rarely goes the whole kiss-the-sky but rather lifts you gently to the clouds -- and here the delicate tone-poem of Christo Redentor, the eight minute Skyman and absorbing Eleventh Step to Heaven remind you of the beauty of blues guitar.

He's also something of a populist -- the lightweight Happy here sounds like its designed to get the hands clapping -- but he never fails deliver an album of diversity but enjoyable coherence.

Good enough, but perhaps a bit too safe and middle-aged for some blues aficionados would be my guess. 

Like the sound of this? Then check out this.

Share It

Your Comments

jos - Feb 14, 2011

Love this album to death, really nice blues!

post a comment

More from this section   Blues articles index

Watermelon Slim: Up Close & Personal (Southern/Yellow Eye)

Watermelon Slim: Up Close & Personal (Southern/Yellow Eye)

Not only does white bluesman Watermelon Slim sound like the blackest 1940s blues player that ever was, but he's also has had an extraordinary life. Believable if you read it in a novel, but all... > Read more

B.B. King: Makin' Love is Good For You (SBird/Southbound)

B.B. King: Makin' Love is Good For You (SBird/Southbound)

With the great B.B. King due to arrive in Australasia for concerts, this now-readily available album from 2000 is timely. It caught him on a career high with his road-tested band in the studio just... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

SAM COOKE, GOSPEL INTO POP: The change was always gonna come

SAM COOKE, GOSPEL INTO POP: The change was always gonna come

At this distance, we can’t be expected to understand what the death of Sam Cooke in the sleazy Hacienda Motel in ’64 meant to black Americans. The former gospel singer was found... > Read more

BOB MARLEY; RASTAMAN VIBRATION RECONSIDERED: The legacy is music and the message

BOB MARLEY; RASTAMAN VIBRATION RECONSIDERED: The legacy is music and the message

The bassist with Hamilton reggae band Katchafire, Ara Adams-Tamatea, said it: "You go to parties now and they are still playing the same '70s Bob albums 20 and 30 years later. Why is that?... > Read more