Delroy Wilson: Mash Up Illiteracy (1974)

 |   |  <1 min read

Delroy Wilson: Mash Up Illiteracy (1974)

In Third World countries music is often the vehicle for social messages and political comment because it gets directly to people who may be unable to read a newspaper or otherwise have access to information.

Reggae singer Delroy Wilson (who died in '95) was one of those who used songs to actually say something . . . although not always so positive. He did also deliver withering Lee Scratch Perry-penned attacks on Prince Buster in song during his youth.

But as he matured he became a musical itinerant wandering from label to label and producer to producer, every now and again scoring a minor classic. His song Better Must Come was chosen by Michael Manley's party as their theme in the '72 elelction in Jamaica.

Wilson also recorded Mash Up Illiteracy, possibly a few times. My copy (pictured) has a production credit to Bunny Lee but some sources say he did a version with Joe Gibbs (although this may be one and the same) and I'm guessing that when it is attributed to Wilson and Dr Alimantado that too is the same song.

So maybe there is just this version, but with various attributions? Ah, it's reggae culture so . . .

But here is Delroy Wilson putting his heart and sentiments on the line for a greater purpose.

For more one-offs, songs with an interesting backstory or just plain oddities see From the Vaults. And there is more reggae in Elsewhere here.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Jona Lewie: You'll Always Find Me in the Kitchen at Parties (1980)

Jona Lewie: You'll Always Find Me in the Kitchen at Parties (1980)

Stiff Records in the UK pulled together an unlikely roster of acts in the late Seventies from Elvis Costello to Ian Dury, Rachel Sweet to Jona Lewie, Larry Wallis to Graham Parker and Wreckless... > Read more

Joan Baez: James and the Gang (1987)

Joan Baez: James and the Gang (1987)

Recent Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Joan Baez has written very few original songs but after her painful separation in '73 from her activist husband David Harris – who had been... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

DARKSIDE by TOM STOPPARD: The difference between right and wrong, innit?

DARKSIDE by TOM STOPPARD: The difference between right and wrong, innit?

Among the more crazy things which some serious stoners believed -- and they believe most things -- was that if you cue up Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon album with the film The Wizard of Oz... > Read more

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . HP LOVECRAFT: High, here and gone.

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . HP LOVECRAFT: High, here and gone.

Now, I'm neither ashamed nor proud of this, but some while back – decades ago – I enjoyed perpetrating pranks and hoaxes, especially postal pranks. Of the latter I would, for... > Read more