Rosalie Allen: Hitler Lives (1945)

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Rosalie Allen: Hitler Lives (1945)

Because the name "Hitler" became such a signifier for all that was evil and his name a shorthand for the inhuman and demonic, it was inevitable that any portrayal of him as a mere man (albeit a very bad one!) was bound to offend many.

Better to think of him as an aberration than a possibility.

In this song by Rosalie Allen -- "The Prairie Star" who popularised the yodelling cowgirl image and was a member of Tex Grande and His Range Riders -- Hitler becomes a different kind of shorthand, for the uncaring soul or those might forget what the world -- and specifically soldiers -- had just been through.

For an earlier take on Hitler check out the Reverend JM Gates here

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory use the RSS feed for daily updates, and check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

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