Sarah Vaughan: After You've Gone (1963)

 |   |  <1 min read

Sarah Vaughan: After You've Gone (1963)

Some very serious jazz people don't take British pianist/singer Jamie Cullum very seriously. They point out he also sings pop, his repertoire includes songs by the White Stripes and hip-hop artists and . . .

All the usual accusations.

Like Herbie Hancock doesn't draw from contemporary music? And what of Coltrane using My Favourite Things as a vehicle?

Cullum gets a mention here because he did the theme music to a British television comedy series After You've Gone and you could hardly accuse him of living too much in the 21st century. The song was written in 1918.

There has hardly been a jazz artist who hasn't covered it, from Louis Armstrong to Paul Whiteman through an alphabet of great names like Sidney Bechet and Coleman Hawkins to Frank Sinatra, Bessie Smith and Nina Simone to . . . .

You name 'em.

And Sassy Vaughan who here belts it out with Benny Carter's band.

One of the greatest and most flexible voices of the 20th century, Sarah Vaughan has been long overdue for a mention at Elsewhere.

Weird that it took thinking about Jamie Cullum to get her here. 

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory use the RSS feed for daily updates, and check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

 

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Atlanta Rhythm Section: Imaginary Lover (1979)

Atlanta Rhythm Section: Imaginary Lover (1979)

There's no real reason for this particular installment of From the Vaults other than the sheer silliness of it. The trick here is to look at the video clip first before you play the sample... > Read more

Mr Flotsam and Mr Jetsam: Is 'e an Aussie, is 'e Lizzy (the Thirties?)

Mr Flotsam and Mr Jetsam: Is 'e an Aussie, is 'e Lizzy (the Thirties?)

This is one of those songs which, once heard, is never forgotten: how can you ever erase lines like "seems this digger likes my figure" or "he being well-born, lived in... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . YOKO ONO: The noises from within

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . YOKO ONO: The noises from within

Yoko is a concept by which we measure our pain -- New York graffiti, 1970. A voice that comes once in a lifetime; unfortunately it came in ours -- Critic Jim Mullen, 1992... > Read more

Various: Cuba, I Am Time (1999)

Various: Cuba, I Am Time (1999)

When any art form has success, especially if it is unexpected, you can expect the ripples for a long time afterwards . . . and like ripples when a stone is thrown in a flat pond, they are of... > Read more