The Beau Brummels: Two Days 'til Tomorrow (1967)

 |   |  <1 min read

The Beau Brummels: Two Days 'til Tomorrow (1967)

Producer Lenny Waronker -- who worked with artists as diverse as Nancy Sinatra, Randy Newman, Ry Cooder and Rickie Lee Jones -- recognised in the voice of the Beau Brummels' singer Sal Valentino a sense of drama . . . and so for this song he went all out with arrangers and a number of other musicians beyond the remaining three-piece he had in front of him.

Written by the band's Ron Elliott (guitar, backing vocals) and his schoolfriend Bob Durand with whom he frequently collaborated, this is one of those mystery songs in many ways: it didn't appear on any album and although referred to as a "single" (on the rare oscasions it is referred to at all) it doesn't appear in any official list of the band's discography.

It was recorded around the time of their Triangle album (an abysmal commercial failure despite considerable merit) and was directly in the lineage of their powerful folk-rock style which was tipping into psychedelia.

The hook however was the problem which saw it dropped from playlists on the quiet: "she's coming" just didn't cut it.

This is lifted from the excellent book/four CD collection  of San Francisco music Love is the Song We Sing

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory use the RSS feed for daily updates, and check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Sex Pistols: God Save the Queen (2002, dance mix)

Sex Pistols: God Save the Queen (2002, dance mix)

One of the more confusing and alarming posters I saw in Britain in 2012 was on a wall in Dover. It was this one, a DJ celebration of the Queen's Diamond Jubilee -- and given the massive... > Read more

The Valli Boys; Night Hawk (1966)

The Valli Boys; Night Hawk (1966)

Quite where Frankie Valli's solo career emerged separate to the Four Season's discography is hard to discern. Before and during the Four Seasons era of the early Sixties he appeared simply as a... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Augustus Pablo: This is Augustus Pablo (Southbound)

Augustus Pablo: This is Augustus Pablo (Southbound)

In the mid-Seventies the hypnotic sound of Augustus Pablo pulled 95bFM listeners close to their radio, because host Duncan Campbell used a Pablo piece (the leisurely Up Wareika Hill) as the... > Read more

Mixed Culture: Movement in Roots/Moving in Dub (Jah Youth)

Mixed Culture: Movement in Roots/Moving in Dub (Jah Youth)

No sentient being could doubt the global reach of reggae which we have essayed previously . . . but it is rarely better evidenced than the existence of this double CD: one disc of the rootsy... > Read more