Push Push: Do Ya Love Me? (1991)

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Push Push: Do Ya Love Me? (1991)

Much loved for their confident rock-star swagger, astonishing vocals by frontman Mikey Havoc, guitarist Silver's good looks and their Kiwi classic single Trippin', Auckland band Push Push were the pivot of the "five bands for five dollars" nights at the Powerstation which gave many now-forgotten groups their first shot on a stage before an audience.

Whatever happened to Bad Boy Lollipop we ask oursleves?

Well, when Steel Panther played the Powerstation recently -- two decades after the heyday of hair metal -- there were rather too many older but familiar faces in the crowd. Many with just as much hair as they once had.

After Trippin', Push Push were obliged to record a second single and their marathon Song 27 was what they came up with. As the clip shows, these were the days of excess . . . and more.

Do Ya Love Me? -- little more than a shout of the title over a riff -- was on the flipside of the single (on the Tall Poppy label) and even now it has that certain something.

Quite what it is we wouldn't want to be drawn on. 

For more one-offs, oddities or songs with an interesting back-story see From the Vaults

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