Robin Zander: Fly Me to the Moon (2011)

 |   |  <1 min read

Robin Zander: Fly Me to the Moon (2011)

On the basis of recent evidence Robin Zander -- singer with the smarter-than-thou Cheap Trick -- has really lost it. Lost his cheekbones, his slim frame and, worst of all because those are forgivably inevitable with advancing years, his sense of taste.

Perhaps it was having uber-brain Rick Nielsen helming Cheap Trick that allowed them to pull off three superb albums in a row -- and deliver a thrillingly exact but pumped up version of the Beatles' Daytripper live -- but out on his own, as he is here, the plot left town long before Zander arrived.

Okay, maybe he isn't entirely at fault because it was the idea of Bob Kulick and Brett Chassen -- self-described "guys from Planet Brooklyn" -- to do an album of Frank Sinatra songs . . . but not your standard tribute, as it were.

Kulick/Chassen somehow heard Sinatra ballads as . . . well, metal-edged stadium rock.

So they invited in Dee Snider of Twisted Sister, Joey Belladonna, Glen Hughes and other leather-lunged screamers to  take on songs like New York New York, I've Got You Under My Skin, Summer Wind and so on.

Zander got Fly Me to the Moon which you might remember -- as Frank does in the clip below -- as a rather lovely swinging song.

Seemingly Zander at al didn't. They reshaped it into this truly awful cover for the album -- consumer warning, folks -- Sin-Atra.

Get it?

Nope, me neither. 

For more one-offs, songs with an interesting backstory or oddities see From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

The Riverboat Captain - Feb 4, 2013

I don't even want to listen to a second of that. Not even to find out how awful it is.

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Atlanta Rhythm Section: Imaginary Lover (1979)

Atlanta Rhythm Section: Imaginary Lover (1979)

There's no real reason for this particular installment of From the Vaults other than the sheer silliness of it. The trick here is to look at the video clip first before you play the sample... > Read more

Harry Partch: And on the Seventh Day, Petals Fell in Petaluma (excerpt, date unknown, possibly Sixties)

Harry Partch: And on the Seventh Day, Petals Fell in Petaluma (excerpt, date unknown, possibly Sixties)

When Tom Waits swerved left from his barroom piano ballads and into using new or found sounds on his clank'n'grind albums in the mid Eighties, he was hailed as an innovator . . . but conspiciously... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

GUEST WRITER GEOFF HARRISON reflects on Keith Emerson and the Moog synthesiser revolution

GUEST WRITER GEOFF HARRISON reflects on Keith Emerson and the Moog synthesiser revolution

Keith Emerson's recent passing powerfully resonated with me – and not just the way he left in early‑March but, more reflectively -- on how that instrument he mastered and pioneered back... > Read more

LOCUS AND LOCATION: THE SOCIO-GEOGRAPHY AND POST-COLONIAL DISCOURSE IN DON McGLASHAN'S DOMINION ROAD

LOCUS AND LOCATION: THE SOCIO-GEOGRAPHY AND POST-COLONIAL DISCOURSE IN DON McGLASHAN'S DOMINION ROAD

Don McGlashan is one of New Zealand's most respected and successful songwriters. He been awarded the Apra Silver Scroll for songwriting 47 times and has been given honorary doctorates from many New... > Read more