George Harrison: Dream Scene (1968)

 |   |  <1 min read

George Harrison: Dream Scene (1968)

This appropriately entitled piece is serious headphone listening for the wee small hours and is perhaps among the most strange things George Harrison's name was ever attached to.

It appeared on the soundtrack to the Joe Massot film Wonderwall (Massot is interviewed here) and as you may hear involves Indian musicians, washes of sound, strange voices, some electric guitar and just generally disjointed strange stuff.

It is certainly experimental in finest sense of the word, and the Beatles had done nothing like it . . . until the Lennon-Ono Revolution 9 later this same year. Stick around the end of this 10 minute piece and you could almost loop the last 30 seconds into Revolution 9.

The Wonderwall film -- a strange period piece, see the clip below -- has been restored and is available on DVD, but I don't think the album is available on CD. This is lifted from the original vinyl, so apologies for the odd surface noises.

It's an odd one. 

 

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Tom Russell: Chocolate Cigarettes (1991)

Tom Russell: Chocolate Cigarettes (1991)

Whether his stories are literally true or not (and some, like the Leadbelly song about boxer Jack Johnson being denied passage on the maiden voyage of the Titanic, aren't), the American... > Read more

Mavis Rivers: Farewell Samoa (1950)

Mavis Rivers: Farewell Samoa (1950)

Because her career as singer was mostly in the United States -- where Sinatra apparently called her the purest voice in jazz -- Mavis Rivers was for many decades after 1953, when she made the first... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Casiotone for the Painfully Alone: Etiquette (2006)

Casiotone for the Painfully Alone: Etiquette (2006)

If nothing else, you had to raise a smile at the nom-de-disque which American singer-songwriter Owen Ashworth adopted. It announces its lo-fi quality, and identifies its audience at the same time.... > Read more

RUTHIE FOSTER (2011): A Southern soul sister rises

RUTHIE FOSTER (2011): A Southern soul sister rises

When the once-great B.B. King recently played in Auckland it was my unhappy task to write the review of his sad, disappointing and uncomfortable performance. The man is clearly past it -- the... > Read more