Andrew Brough: Andy Dandy (2000)

 |   |  <1 min read

Andrew Brough: Andy Dandy (2000)
In a recent interview with Wellington singer-songwriter Charlotte Yates about her forthcoming Mansfield project (New Zealand musicians setting the poems of Katherine Mansfield to music), I asked her about Andrew Brough.

He had appeared on her Baxter album in 2000, James K Baxter's poems to music by the likes of Dave Dobbyn, Greg Johnson, Mahinaarangi Tocker, Martin Phillipps, Emma Paki and others.

She said she didn't know what had become of him but, like all of us, she loved his musicality so approached him to contribute.

Andrew had been in the Blue Meanies, Orange, famously Straitjacket Fits (leaving after musical and personal disagreements following the Melt album) and his own short-lived outfit Bike.

But by the end of the 20thcentury he had simply disappeared as far as most people were concerned.

She said he was reluctant to contribute but did, choosing this children's lyric to set into a piece of music which was pure Brough dream-pop.

She said he didn't want to appear at the concert performing it.

Within a week of that conversation we all heard about Andrew again.

He died in Dunedin in early February 2020.

I didn't know him but did spend a little time in his company and he was funny, sometimes withdrawn and shy, encyclopedic in his knowledge of Sixties pop and . . .

And even though he had been missing for 20 years, he will be missed.

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

Fraser Gardyne - Feb 11, 2020

Lovely little dreamy pop song as you say Graham. Very sad... :-(

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Sarah Vaughan: After You've Gone (1963)

Sarah Vaughan: After You've Gone (1963)

Some very serious jazz people don't take British pianist/singer Jamie Cullum very seriously. They point out he also sings pop, his repertoire includes songs by the White Stripes and hip-hop artists... > Read more

James Blood Ulmer: Are You Glad To Be In America (1980)

James Blood Ulmer: Are You Glad To Be In America (1980)

For many of the open-eared among jazz listeners -- those who had grown up on rock guitarists and heard in Hendrix the vanguard of a fusion, followed Miles Davis through Bitches Brew and Jack... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Uluru/Ayers Rock, Outback Australia: Into the great wide open

Uluru/Ayers Rock, Outback Australia: Into the great wide open

>Uluru at the close of another cloudless day in the desert. In the designated “sunset viewing spot” a few kilometres from the big red rock, campervans and cars are arriving. In this... > Read more

PAUL McCARTNEY: TUG OF WAR, CONSIDERED (1982): The Mac was back?

PAUL McCARTNEY: TUG OF WAR, CONSIDERED (1982): The Mac was back?

When Paul McCartney left Wings and the Seventies behind he delivered his still interesting McCartney II album of songs and electronic experiments. Danny Baker in the... > Read more