Stan Freberg and Daws Butler: Elderly Man River (1957)

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Stan Freberg and Daws Butler: Elderly Man River (1957)

The best satire is timeless because it pokes fun at human frailties and foibles, and the most pompous and authoritarian among us.

These days we don't hear quite so much from “the grammar police” (although don't get me started on the those who use potential instead of possible) but they are still out there and – when conjoined with the new generation of woke individuals – they would grind us down into correct but willfully inoffensive language.

And those folks are not new.

Here is the Great American Comedian and satirist San Freberg – who here ridiculed skiffle and folk, and here the manufacturing of rock'n'roll stars in the Fifties – as he tries to sing a Great American Standard.

For more one-offs, oddities or songs with an interesting backstory see From the Vaults.

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