Luisa Maita: Fio da Memoria (Cumbancha/Ode)

 |   |  1 min read

Na Asa
Luisa Maita: Fio da Memoria (Cumbancha/Ode)

As the daughter of a Brazilian composer (her father) and an equally well-known producer (her mother), this singer-songwriter was perhaps always destined for a music career.

In her younger days she sang in her father's band and her interests were in samba and bossa nova.

So far, so familiar.

But this, her second solo album, steps even away from the tropes of those styles and engages an eclectic mix of traditional percussion, downbeat electronica, slippery and seductive ballads (akin to a Portuguese Vanessa Daou in places like the sensual Ole) and so much more.

Right from the clever opener Na Asa/On Wings which rides processed beats and changes tempo, Maita delivers the unexpected (spaghetti western guitars, a bassline Joy Division would have been proud to claim) alongside just enough of the familiar Brazilian sounds to pull you in.

The album title means something like the weave or tapestry of memory and that's what is here: she intricately pulls together threads of her cultural and family background with the technological present, contemporary r'n'b and indie.rock . . . and her lyrics (in translation in the helpful booklet) confirm that here is a woman who has staked out her ground and is going to hold it.

Her songs of pain and hurt sound just as compelling as those of celebration.

Not just another breathy, ennui-filled Brazilian singer but someone extending the contract of her music into very interesting territory.

We could file this under World Music in Elsewhere but let's not, because that might marginalise her away from more mainstream listeners who could actually embrace this.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Pop Mechanix: Now-Then; One Hit Windows (Failsafe)

Pop Mechanix: Now-Then; One Hit Windows (Failsafe)

It would be fair to observe that when the countback of Kiwi bands of the Eighties is done the name "Pop Mechanix" comes up much less frequently than it should. Yet here was a... > Read more

Goldfrapp: Head First (Mute)

Goldfrapp: Head First (Mute)

If Rip Van Winkle had nodded off a few decades ago and was woken by the sound of this album he'd be forgiven for thinking nothing much had changed: on this, the fifth album by Alison Goldfrapp and... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

ORNETTE COLEMAN, LOVE REVOLUTION 1968: The Italian job

ORNETTE COLEMAN, LOVE REVOLUTION 1968: The Italian job

I thought I knew all about Ornette Coleman, a man nominally described as a jazz musician but among the most unconstrained musical geniuses of the 20th century.  I’ve got a couple of... > Read more

Robin Zander: Fly Me to the Moon (2011)

Robin Zander: Fly Me to the Moon (2011)

On the basis of recent evidence Robin Zander -- singer with the smarter-than-thou Cheap Trick -- has really lost it. Lost his cheekbones, his slim frame and, worst of all because those are... > Read more