The Horrors: V (Caroline/Universal)

 |   |  1 min read

Weighed Down
The Horrors: V (Caroline/Universal)

Live at the 2010 Big Day Out, the Horrors were impressive as a rock band of the old style: black jeans, skinny legs, loud and full of familiar tropes which they delivered with affection and passion.

Some of that translated onto their albums and now on their fifth they reset the direction a little, veering slightly away from their melange of garageband, heroic stadium krautrock and a kind of brooding gesturalism.

They really are quite a mis-named band because they rarely reach towards the Goth end of the spectrum and here the reference points are more along the lines of Bowie synth-rock (the slow-paced Ghost) and early Gary Numan (the crunch and synth-swathes of the emotionally cool Hologram).

Older heads have always found such references in the Horrors' work (a bit of Eighties Liverpool was evident previously) and here the electronic backdrops sometimes hark back to bands like Tangerine Dream -- who seem to be cropping a lot recently as a touchstone -- more than anything in the contemporary landscape.

That's not to say the Horrors don't bring anything of themselves into this broad orbit, but is perhaps too easy to namecheck rather than accept this for what it is: a great sounding album that lyrically suggests more unease than it states, and one which knows the value of a chugging, seven minute synth-rock song (Something to Remember Me By which is New Order-meets-Suede) to get a stadium moving.

A few more abrasive tracks like Weighed Down would not have gone amiss. 

Yes, the Horrors are a bit too obviously the sum of influences to be considered original but on the evidence here they would, once again, be worth seeing live. 

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Jackson Browne: Time the Conqueror (Inside)

Jackson Browne: Time the Conqueror (Inside)

This album title partially reflects the thoughtful Browne's frame of mind in many tracks here: he's 60 and a greybeard so it isn't surprising he might be in reflective mode - as he is on the title... > Read more

Peter Gabriel: New Blood (Real World)

Peter Gabriel: New Blood (Real World)

In the mid Nineties when no tribute album to Van Morrison had been forthcoming and none seemed planned, Morrison took matters into his own hands and on No Prima Donna -- with Lisa Stansfield, Elvis... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

13th FLOOR ELEVATORS (1966-69): Shall we take a trip, or a Roky ride?

13th FLOOR ELEVATORS (1966-69): Shall we take a trip, or a Roky ride?

The description “psychedelic music” – much like “freedom” – can mean whatever you want. The first albums with “psychedelic” in the title were by... > Read more

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . WOULD YOU BELIEVE: Care for Pet Sounds inna English accent, guv'nor?

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . WOULD YOU BELIEVE: Care for Pet Sounds inna English accent, guv'nor?

In the second part of his 2002 autobiography 2Stoned, Andrew Loog Oldham – manager and sometime producer of the young Stones, founder of Immediate Records and more – wrote about the... > Read more