Cairo Knife Fight: Seven (Universal)

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A-Eight
Cairo Knife Fight: Seven (Universal)

The first thing we observe here on the second album by this powerful duo of American guitarist George Pajon and New Zealand drummer Nick Gaffaney is that the track titles are . . . hmmm.

The opener is (1), the next is A-Nine, then it is (5), A-Six, (7), A-Four, (9), A-Seven and . . . we'd say “and so on” but there seems no discernible mathematical or alphabetical pattern (although we concede maths is not our strong suit).

The numbered tracks however are all short – the longest 90 seconds, the shortest 20 – and as such are little more than downbeat, quiet studio noodles which often sound incomplete.

But alternating them between the more typical CKFight tracks – guitar rage, raw vocals – they serve the purpose of breathing spaces. But not one of them adds anything of substance. (Just listen to them back-to-back.)

As to the alphabetical nomenclature pieces which often have overt political references, some thrill for their speed metal thrash or distorted and declamatory edge.

But flailing about decrying America as on A-Three (“I see you for what you are . . . you won't believe your eyes, it's so fucking stupid””) just comes of as sound and fury, and we know what that signifies.

The closer A-Eight is the most interesting thing here, if you get that far.

The firepower is impressive of course, but as an album this isn't.

Elsewhere has an archival interview with Cairo Knife Fight here

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