Van Morrison: Latest Record Project Vol 1. (Warner/digital outlets)

 |   |  1 min read

Van Morrison: Latest Record Project Vol 1. (Warner/digital outlets)

The few Van Morrison's biographies this writer has read could all be titled Bitter From Birth.

He might have tapped into some beautiful Celtic soul and mysticism all those decades ago, but he's always been humourless and – even to the present day – harbours grudges (notably about how he was burned by the music business more than half a century ago).

There have been some interesting albums in the past many decades but, aside from Keep It Simple, Born to Sing and Keep Me Singing, too few to be seriously bothered with.

Recently Morrison has become bellicose about what he sees as the fake science surrounding Covid-19, that the British government is fascist for the lockdowns and more such nonsense besides.

He's 75 so has had a lot of decades for his bitterness to become so honed and embedded that he sees himself as one of the few remaining rebellious outliers (Where Have All the Rebels Gone on this sprawling, 28 song collection of paranoia, conspiracy nonsense, far-right blather where the deep state is actually a real thing).

Seems anyone who doesn't agree with him simply can't think for themselves and are hooked on self-indulgent therapy (Psychoanalysts' Ball), he asks Why Are You on Facebook?, there's a demanding and ungrateful woman on the Sam Cooke-styled soul-pop No Good Deed Goes Unpunished (nowhere near as funny as this) and there's more self-justification.

Ironically the music is fine and he isn't in too bad a voice (not the Van of old of course) but, while we know that at this point in history we live in a relentless culture of complaint, Morrison telling us he's just saying his piece simply doesn't stand scrutiny.

He's the same bitter from birth person he always was, and now – Covid giving him the opportunity – he just widens his scattergun approach, makes some embarrassing special pleading (the sensitively sung Tried To Do the Right Thing) and claims some martyrdom for being who he is (the bluesy The Long Con where he claims to be “a targeted individual”).

Somewhere in here – with his political positioning excised – there's a half-decent 10-song album.

But the title suggests there might be a Vol 2?

Spare us.

.

You can hear this album on Spotify here

Share It

Your Comments

Kelvin Roy-Gapper - May 10, 2021

Victim culture (old idea: attack is best form of defence, and the more far out, the better...sounds like Trump)

post a comment

More from this section   Music at Elsewhere articles index

BEST OF ELSEWHERE 2009 Elvis Costello: Secret, Profane and Sugarcane (Starbucks/Universal)

BEST OF ELSEWHERE 2009 Elvis Costello: Secret, Profane and Sugarcane (Starbucks/Universal)

On his what is his thirtysomethingth album here's Elvis Costello's problem as I see it: it is his thirtysomethingth album. As with Eric Clapton who could deliver the best album of his career... > Read more

Lontalius: Side One (digital outlets)

Lontalius: Side One (digital outlets)

Earlier this year Hayley Williams, frontwoman and writer for the US rock band Paramore released her debut album Petals for Armor. However within the 15-song album, the first 10 had... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Dub Spencer and Trance Hill: Riding Strange Horses (Echo Beach/Yellow)

Dub Spencer and Trance Hill: Riding Strange Horses (Echo Beach/Yellow)

Those who know their spaghetti westerns and love a bit of dubbery will welcome this new installment from the Swiss band Spencer/Hill (aka bassist Marcel Stalder, guitarist Markus Meier, keyboard... > Read more

PETULA CLARK. GREATEST HITS, CONSIDERED (1984): A sign of her various times

PETULA CLARK. GREATEST HITS, CONSIDERED (1984): A sign of her various times

It wasn't until some time later when my mum said, “Oh, I remember her” that I realised Petula Clark wasn't just another Cilla, Lulu, Sandie or Marianne. At the time – the... > Read more