Chinbat Baasankhuu: The Art of the Mongolian Yatga (Arc Music)

 |   |  <1 min read

Variations on two traditional songs
Chinbat Baasankhuu: The Art of the Mongolian Yatga (Arc Music)

For those who haven't been paying attention, the Mongolian yatga is like a cross-border cousin to the Korean gayageum, Japanese koto and Chinese gu-zheng.

We're joking of course.

You're allowed to say, "Wow, who knew?"

So let's be clearer: The yatga is a plucked, 13 or 21-string instrument played horizontally and it's extremely large. And rarely heard outside Mongolia.

But if you do want to hear someone play it then this professor at the National University of Culture and Art in the department of traditional music in Ulan Bator is the one.

As with the great gayageum master Bjungki Hwang, she makes the instrument sing and its staccato sound seem gently romantic.

This lovely collection -- with the customary interesting and informative liner notes from Arc Music which offers background to the instrument, the artist and the music which come contemporary composers or popular songs.

Even if you can't be bothered with reading all that, you can simply tune in to this music which is seductive.

In fact, if you only buy one yatga album this month . . . 

Just jokin' (But not really) 

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   World Music articles index

THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE WORLD MUSIC QUESTIONNAIRE: Lisa Jen of 9Bach

THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE WORLD MUSIC QUESTIONNAIRE: Lisa Jen of 9Bach

At the forthcoming Womad in Tarakani wise ears will head to the sessions by the Welsh alt.folk group 9Bach whose ethereal (and exotically Welsh-language songs) have previously captured... > Read more

OTTMAR LIEBERT INTERVIEWED (2006): A new age of flamenco

OTTMAR LIEBERT INTERVIEWED (2006): A new age of flamenco

Very few musicians can claim to have created a genre, but with his 1990 album Nouveau Flamenco, guitarist Ottmar Liebert did exactly that. Liebert’s hybrid style -- which existed... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

T Bone Burnett: Tooth of Crime (Nonesuch)

T Bone Burnett: Tooth of Crime (Nonesuch)

Burnett might not be a household name but you can bet his name is in the small print in many households: among other albums he has produced are Los Lobos' How Will the Wolf Survive?, a couple for... > Read more

Perry Como: (Get Your Kicks on) Route 66 (1959)

Perry Como: (Get Your Kicks on) Route 66 (1959)

In the hands of Chuck Berry and the Rolling Stones, Route 66 became a classic rock song -- but its history goes further back and the song has been rendered in the styles of earlier eras. And later... > Read more