Max Romeo: Wet Dream (1969)

 |   |  <1 min read

Max Romeo: Wet Dream (1969)

The great Max Romeo has his War Ina Babylon (produced by Lee Scratch Perry) as an Essential Elsewhere album for its street politics and memorable songs, but this was the thing which got him a lot of attention.

Produced by Bunny Lee at Studio One, understandably banned by the BBC ("lie down gal let me push it up, push it up"), not released in Jamaica, reaching number two on the British charts (headed off by the Beatles' Get Back) and weakly defended by Romeo as a song about rain on the roof -- the Lovin' Spoonful, see below, it ain't -- it remains a classic reggae single for its wit, groove laid down by Aston Barrett (of the Wailers), Leroy Wallace (of the extraordinary Rockers film) on drums and Ronnie Williams on guitar . . .

Oh, and because of the rude and rather unflattering lyrics about the object of his desire, of course.

Dirty felluh! 

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory use the RSS feed for daily updates, and check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

Gavin Hancock - Nov 22, 2012

Nice and bouncy early reggae riddim on this...love cranking it up on a sunny day.

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Rev. C.L. Franklin: The Eagle Stirreth Her Nest (1953)

Rev. C.L. Franklin: The Eagle Stirreth Her Nest (1953)

The Reverend C.L. Franklin has been mentioned previously at Elsewhere, but only in regard to his daughter Aretha. But Clarence LaVaughn Franklin (1915-94) deserves a mention here in his own... > Read more

Shoes: Tomorrow Night (1978)

Shoes: Tomorrow Night (1978)

In that great alphabet of power pop kicked off by the Beatles and which includes Badfinger, Big Star, Cheap Trick and so on, the Shoes out of Zion, Illinois are perhaps the least known today.... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Oliver Mtukudzi: Wonai (Elite)

Oliver Mtukudzi: Wonai (Elite)

Known as "Tuku" after the style of music he created, singer-guitarist Mtukudzi from Zimbabwe battles the usual problem that musicians from Africa face: if Peter Gabriel isn't behind you... > Read more

Charley Pride: Lawyers, sums and money

Charley Pride: Lawyers, sums and money

The phone call was going to be a simple one. The gentleman in question was truly one of country music's real gentleman, Charley Pride, the black singer who had conquered the whitest music genre... > Read more