Luke Jackson: . . . And Then Some (Popsicle)

 |   |  1 min read

Luke Jackson: Come Tomorrow
Luke Jackson: . . . And Then Some (Popsicle)

After a mention of the late Robert Kirby's string arrangements in a review of the Magic Numbers' The Runaway, this Canadian singer-songwriter with a well-stamped passport got in touch: he too had benefited from Kirby's smart touch.

And he sent on a copy of this album which opens with a classic blast of power-pop (Come Tomorrow, the title even sounds like Badfinger/Raspberries/Big Star) . . . but that is just one of the many strings to his.

For Trouble he unashamedly borrows from Oasis' Wonderwall as a starting point for a quiet ballad (with flute and celeste), Goodbye London is a bristling, good natured punk-edged pub-rock poke: "Who's gonna fleece me on a Friday, who's gonna offer me cheap skunk? Goodbye Camden, goodbye dodgy Thai cuisine . . . Goodbye London, I won't forget that you were always good for me".)

But there is quiet here too: the acoustic ballad A Little Voice has a reflective, pastoral quality; and the closer is the insightful The Fear (both with gorgeous Kirby strings).

Recorded in Sweden in the studio of former Roxette member Christoff Lundquist and with help from longtime friend Magnus Borjeson (who has played with power-pop charmers the Cardigans), this album is unrepentantly pop of the old style, framed by the mid-period Beatles and Badfinger, with the lyrical smarts of an astute observer of life: "At the end of the game when you cash in your chips, wil you have the answer on your lips? Like Icarus flying too close to the sun, searching for a way to come undone."

And he has a sense of humour: one track is entitled 1970's Kids TV Show Theme, and it sort of is.

In the international press -- Canada, the UK and various parts of Europe -- Jackson has been placed on the same songwriting axis as Brian Wilson (which I don't hear myself) and the Teenage Fanclub (yep).

Wherever you place him however, he makes intelligent adult-themed pop which can be pumped up for the driving, life-affirming jangle of Come Tomorrow or soaked in gently on the more intimate tracks.

For more on Luke Jackson go here

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Maisey Rika: Tohu (Moonlight Sounds)

Maisey Rika: Tohu (Moonlight Sounds)

This debut album introduces an impressive singer-songwriter who manages to be expressive without resorting to the cliches of the faux-soul yodel which has infected many in the post-Whitney/Idol... > Read more

Dappled Cities: Zounds (Inertia/Border)

Dappled Cities: Zounds (Inertia/Border)

This Sydney-formed band don't lack the grand gesture: this album is chock full of wide screen, sweeping, heroically realised pop-rock noise propelled by massive guitars, strings, the kitchen sink... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Wynton Marsalis: He and She (Blue Note/EMI)

Wynton Marsalis: He and She (Blue Note/EMI)

It must be difficult being Wynton Marsalis, having done it all (at least if you consider "all" being going backwards through jazz pre-Sixties and bringing the music to the current... > Read more

THE CITY UNDER THE SKY (2017): Images of Oslo, Norway

THE CITY UNDER THE SKY (2017): Images of Oslo, Norway

Although Norway is rightly known for its fjords and towering landscapes, the capital city Oslo was established around flatter land. That means that when in the city itself or even at one of the... > Read more