Kitty, Daisy and Lewis: Smoking in Heaven (Sunday Best)

 |   |  <1 min read

Kitty, Daisy and Lewis: I'm Going Back
Kitty, Daisy and Lewis: Smoking in Heaven (Sunday Best)

While some have be quite taken by KD&Lewis' retro look and sound -- which is undeniably entertaining on the surface and live -- I have remained immune and indifferent to their charms.

And nothing on this album of all originals can persuade me to be otherwise.

These songs sound lame when they aren't just plain dull, or working out some tropes which so many others have not only done better but filled with more attitude and life.

The lo-fi sound may have some appeal but here it just makes these songs sound undernourished and too often they come off like contestants in an amateur hour contest.

They don't do the doin'-me-wrong "blues" any services either, and even with their ska manoeuvres they don't sound like they could get a party started.

Imelda Mae set a bar which these people seem more than happy to limbo under.

Dreary.

Like the idea of this but want to hear better? Then check this out.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Various Artists: Born into This; The Music of Rattle (Rattle)

Various Artists: Born into This; The Music of Rattle (Rattle)

As regular readers of these pages will know (Ha! Always wanted to say that), the Auckland-based label Rattle -- and its imprint Rattle Jazz -- have been Firm Favourites at Elsewhere for delivering... > Read more

Mark Lanegan: Imitations (Heavenly/PIAS)

Mark Lanegan: Imitations (Heavenly/PIAS)

Pity anyone collecting the complete works of Mark Lanegan who not only runs a solo career but has been a gravitas-filled voice in Screaming Trees, QOTSA, the Gutter Twins, Soulsavers, Twilight... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . YOKO ONO: The noises from within

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . YOKO ONO: The noises from within

Yoko is a concept by which we measure our pain -- New York graffiti, 1970. A voice that comes once in a lifetime; unfortunately it came in ours -- Critic Jim Mullen, 1992... > Read more

BENJAMIN ZEPHANIAH INTERVIEWED (2000):  The people's poet laureate

BENJAMIN ZEPHANIAH INTERVIEWED (2000): The people's poet laureate

Britain's most popular serious performance poet for more than two decades, Benjamin Zephaniah, laughs as he recalls hating poetry as a kid. If you said you liked it, it was as if you were... > Read more