The Supremes: Floy Joy (1972)

 |   |  <1 min read

The Supremes: Floy Joy (1972)

In the mid Sixties when people were earnestly looking to Bob Dylan for answers, someone asked him who his favourite poet was.

"Smokey Robinson," he replied.

Fair call. Smokey's songs like Got a Job had wit and Tracks of My Tears had heart. You can't add or subtract a word from My Guy or You Really Got a Hold On Me.

But even poets have their off days and you'd have to think Smokey was at a low point when he scribbled down Floy Joy -- and so were the Diana Ross-less Supremes to accept it.

Mary Wilson gamely does her best with the banal lyrics but there's not a lot to be said for it other than it at least sounded like the Supremes of the mid Sixties thanks to the Funk Brothers.

But it was a top five hit (because of its simplicity?) . . . and perhaps it was an early example of bubblegum pop (because of its simplicity?).

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory use the RSS feed for daily updates, and check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Paul McCartney: Ode to a Koala Bear (1983)

Paul McCartney: Ode to a Koala Bear (1983)

Okay, at a time when Paul McCartney's whole recording career has been given serious consideration at Elsewhere, this seems frivolous and cruel. But fun. This odd song appeared on B-side of... > Read more

Lou Christie: Lightnin' Strikes (1966)

Lou Christie: Lightnin' Strikes (1966)

Few people can say they celebrated their 23rd birthday in quite the same way as Lou Christie, this single was number one the US -- and just starting to go global. It was quite a comeback for... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

JEAN-PAUL BOURELLY: JUNGLE COWBOY, CONSIDERED (1987): His avant-gotta direction debut album

JEAN-PAUL BOURELLY: JUNGLE COWBOY, CONSIDERED (1987): His avant-gotta direction debut album

In an interview with Elsewhere some years ago, Vernon Reid of the seminal black rock band Living Colour observed that once they got through the door of the hierarchy of the white rock critical... > Read more

PETULA CLARK. GREATEST HITS, CONSIDERED (1984): A sign of her various times

PETULA CLARK. GREATEST HITS, CONSIDERED (1984): A sign of her various times

It wasn't until some time later when my mum said, “Oh, I remember her” that I realised Petula Clark wasn't just another Cilla, Lulu, Sandie or Marianne. At the time – the... > Read more