YASMIN BROWN’S BEST EPs OF 2017

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YASMIN BROWN’S BEST EPs OF 2017

Having spent the majority of the year being exposed to an abundance of new acts, it seems fitting that I revisit my favourites. 2017 has been an incredible year for new acts, both Kiwi and international, and it has been a great joy to have been able to discover so much new talent.

These are the 10 that stood out the most. The ones that have the ability to send shivers down your spine, incite all kinds of emotion, or get stuck in your head for days.


Caution Thieves: Songs From the Great Divide

It’s not uncommon to think that avoiding sad music will lift your mood and bring you out of a slump, and in many cases that’s certainly true. Sometimes, though, you need to hear that other people have been through turmoil and have made it out the other side. Caution Thieves took us on a journey from hopeless to hopeful by artistically implementing juxtaposing sounds, creating something truly stunning.

Read the full review here.


resized__300x300_glasshousesTablefox: Glass Houses

With so much music floating around that lacks depth both sonically and lyrically, Tablefox are something of a blessing. Their music tells a story of frustration, of heartbreak, and of eventual optimism and is undoubtedly worth a few minutes of your time.

Read the full review here.


Dual: Self-Titled

Dual’s debut, self-titled release is exciting. There are few acts that can combine classic instruments and synthetically creates sounds as successfully as this duo have done – a sound that draws you in from the moment the EP kicks off.

Read the full review here.


The Orange Hypothesis: The Dregs of the Storm

If you ever need to listen to something that releases you from your own mind, The Dregs of the Storm is it. The EP is simultaneously subtle yet highly impactful, pushing you to embrace your emotions before letting them go, feeling instantly liberated.

Read the full review here.


nyck: Alive

nyck are another duo that have seamlessly integrated synths into an otherwise piano driven collection of tracks. The relatability of the themes addressed in the EP extends to the most mundane parts of life that musicians often steer clear of, and you suddenly feel much less guilty about having periods of time wherein you feel lost. nyck have made no attempt to dress up the ugly parts of life, while also touching on the most beautiful, which is what makes Alive so incredibly special.

Read the full review here.


resized__240x240_268x0w_2Theia: Theia

The combination of heartfelt lyrics and a catchy beat are often a recipe for success, but Theia took it to a whole new level with her first ever release. Addressing the issues many in their early 20s will face, Theia has turned the pain around and decided to make it a dance party instead. Her voice has a tone to it which allows her to stand out among the many solo female artists trying to make their mark today, and I still have no doubt that we will be seeing much more of her in 2018.

Read the full review here.


resized__240x240_astridAstrid S: Party’s Over

It may be her first release, but there is a level of insight in Astrid S’ debut that many spend their whole career striving to achieve. Put together with some breathtaking vocals and perfectly formed pop music and you have a near flawless EP that will most certainly garner a large and dedicated fan base as we roll into the new year. Having already been signed to Universal Music, her name will soon be rolling easily off your tongue, if it isn’t already.

Read the full review here.


Sainte: Smile and Wave

Breaking away from an old project to start a new one is a brave move, but it is one that has worked out excellently for ex-We Are the In Crowd lead vocalist Tay Jardine. Smile and Wave is a glorious comeback full of bubble pop tunes that ooze colour and fun.

Read the full review here.


Billie Eilish: Don’t Smile at Me

The music industry is filled with talented women this year, but none so impressive as Billie Eilish. She’s just 15, and she has pop music down to a fine art. While there is at times a slight inauthenticity to her music, with some themes feeling a little too mature for her age, Don’t Smile at Me should be taken at face value, and accepted for the glorious sensation that it is.

Read the full review here.


Hater: Red Blinders

They may be fairly new to the scene, but Hater already know exactly what they’re doing when it comes to making music. Red Blinders boasts a magical and dreamy vibe without implementing any electronic elements, something that is incredibly rare in today’s market, and the vocals of front woman Caroline Landahl propel this music from good to outstanding.

Read the full review here.

Yasmin Brown is a dedicated music lover and avid critic, who completed her PGDip in Communication Studies at Auckland University of Technology. She’s at her peak when buried in the middle of a mosh pit, and now continues to pursue her love of live music journalism in Cambridge, UK, often finding herself popping to London to check out her favourite bands, as well as discovering a mass of new talent

and now you can have your say on the year's best EPs . . . 

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