Essential Elsewhere

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The Ramones: Hey! Ho! Let's Go: Ramones Anthology (1999)

1 Jun 2010  |  4 min read  |  1

Like many of my generation, I can remember exactly where I was when JFK, RFK and John Lennon were shot. And when Kurt Cobain proved, contrary to what he sang, he did have a gun. But with as much clarity I can also remember when I first heard the Ramones’ Sheena is a Punk Rocker. It came on a tape from a friend in London and I was driving when this blast of wonderful noise... > Read more

Sheena is a Punk Rocker

Various Artists: The History of Rhythm and Blues 1952-1957 (2010 collection)

24 May 2010  |  3 min read  |  1

The first two volumes in this 4-CD series which traces the history of old style r'n'b have already been acclaimed at Elsewhere here and here respectively. These multi-genre, colour-blind, cross-label and highly inclusive collections not only cherry pick the most significant artists and songs in the growth of r'n'b but also intelligently include extensive selections from other genres (the... > Read more

Ruth Brown: Mama He Treats Your Daughter Mean (live in '56)

The Rolling Stones: Exile on Main St (1972, reissued 2010)

17 May 2010  |  4 min read  |  1

Few albums in rock have been so surrounded in dark mythology as this sprawling double album which was the last great gasp of the Rolling Stones. Certainly subsequent albums -- Goats Head Soup, It's Only Rock'n'Roll and Black and Blue particularly -- had their great moments but (aside from Jagger's embrace of New York dance and Richards' forays into reggae) they were mostly retracing familiar... > Read more

The Rolling Stones: Plundered My Soul (1971/2010)

Moby Grape, Moby Grape (1967)

12 Apr 2010  |  5 min read

The short and dramatic story of San Francisco psychedelic folk-rockers Moby Grape is one of the collision of blazing musical talent, shonky management, record company overkill and bad luck. And it all happened in less that a year. Within six months of their classic self-titled debut album released in mid '67 -- a fortnight after the Beatles' baroque-pop Sgt Pepper's, but a world removed... > Read more

Moby Grape: 8.05

The Incredible String Band: Wee Tam and The Big Huge (1968)

6 Apr 2010  |  2 min read

Sometimes for my own private amusement I will sing aloud The Incredible String Band's The Son of Noah's Brother in its entirety. All 16 seconds of it. The lyrics run, "Many were the lifetimes of the son of Noah's brother, see his coat the ragged riches of his soul". And that's it: a lovely descending melody and not a wasted note or word. Quite what it means is anyone's... > Read more

The Incredible String Band: Douglas Traherne Harding

Love: Forever Changes (1967)

21 Mar 2010  |  4 min read  |  2

When the British rock magazine Mojo published a special supplement on psychedelic rock back in February 2005, among the albums noted were all the usual suspects: Electric Ladyland by Jimi Hendrix took out the top spot and further down were Pink Floyd’s Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s and albums by the Mothers of Invention, Jefferson Airplane, Country... > Read more

Love: Andmoreagain

John Mayall: Blues From Laurel Canyon (1968)

28 Feb 2010  |  3 min read  |  3

In the wake of '67s Sgt Pepper's the new thing in rock was "the concept album" and at the tail-end of that decade and well into the 70s a long list of bands weighed in: the Pretty Things with Parachute,The Who with Tommy, The Moody Blues, Genesis, Yes . . . Mostly these were musicians with an art school background and so testing themselves over a 40 minute album was... > Read more

John Mayall: Fly Tomorrow

Donovan: Troubadour; The Definitive Collection 1964-76 (1998 compilation)

22 Feb 2010  |  3 min read  |  1

When I interviewed Donovan in 1998 -- mindful I might have to introduce him to a readership which had probably never heard of him -- I noted that even back in his heyday of the Sixties he'd been a hard one to figure out. The "folkie" tag he'd been pinned with after the success of his first songs Colours and Catch the Wind (and his "protest" song, the cover of Buffy... > Read more

Donovan: Sunshine Superman (1966)

Scott Walker, In Five Easy Pieces (2003)

10 Feb 2010  |  4 min read

The only time I saw Scott Walker I burst out laughing. It was the mid-60s and he was one of the (non-sibling) Walker Brothers on a package tour with the Yardbirds (guitarist Jimmy Page) and Roy Orbison. When the Walker Brothers ran on to the Auckland Town Hall stage, skinny-legged guys in tight pants and teased-out bouffants, they looked like hairy lollipops. My mates and I hooted with... > Read more

Scott Walker: In My Room

Little Feat: Dixie Chicken (1973)

24 Jan 2010  |  3 min read  |  1

The critics liked Little Feat -- and Dixie Chicken -- a whole lot better than the public. Today any number of greybeards will tell you how they were deeply into the band but (as with those who were always into the Velvet Underground) the facts speak for themselves. Only 30,000 bothered to go to a shop and buy Dixie Chicken when it was released. It was the band's third commercial failure... > Read more

Little Feat: Roll Um Easy

Ravi Shankar, Improvisations (1962)

3 Jan 2010  |  3 min read

George Harrison quite correctly referred to the sitar master Pandit Ravi Shankar as "the godfather of world music" -- and Shankar was creating and giving his blessing to cross-cultural fusions and experiments long before the phrase "world music" was even thought of. There are of course many dozens of Shankar albums in the world -- from straight-ahead classical ragas to... > Read more

Ravi Shankar: Fire Night (with Bud Shank)

Dave Dobbyn: Twist (1994)

30 Dec 2009  |  3 min read  |  2

With the Australian success of the Footrot Flats film in the early Nineties, it made sense for Dave Dobbyn to relocate across the Tasman and ride the wave of popularity of the songs he wrote for it. And in that great tradition of indifference Australians have shown New Zealand musicians -- more so then than today -- Dobbyn’s career languished. But his music didn’t. In... > Read more

Dave Dobbyn: Betrayal

Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band: Trout Mask Replica (1969)

23 Nov 2009  |  4 min read

When I first heard Trout Mask Replica some time in early '70 I fled. It was all very well being told that Captain Beefheart (Don Van Vliet) sounded like Howlin' Wolf, but that would be like describing happy, mop-top Beatlemania to someone then playing them I Am The Walrus. Or showing them lots of pictures of eyed-shadowed Ziggy Stardust and getting all excited about glam-rock -- then playing... > Read more

Philip Glass: Koyaanisqatsi (1983)

7 Nov 2009  |  3 min read

There are few things more depressing than observing a revolution become a style (or the Beatles’ Revolution become a Nike ad). Or to witness innovation morph into cliché. When director Godfrey Reggio’s innovative film Koyaanisqatsi appeared in the early Eighties it had an immediate impact on popular music and film culture. Ostensibly a narration-free look at the impact of... > Read more

Philip Glass: Resource

Arthur Alexander: The Ultimate Arthur Alexander (1993 compilation)

6 Sep 2009  |  3 min read

You only need look at a partial list of those who covered the songs of Arthur Alexander (1940-1993) to get a measure of the man's gifts: the young Beatles (John Lennon a big fan who sang Soldier of Love and Anna); the Rolling Stones and the late Willy De Ville (You Better Move On); Ray Columbus (Where Have You Been retitled as Til We Kissed); Ry Cooder (Go Home Girl); just about every... > Read more

Arthur Alexander: Every Day I Have to Cry Some (1993 version)

The Beatles: Rubber Soul (1965)

31 Aug 2009  |  6 min read  |  3

While there are any number of Beatle albums which are essential, there is a case to be made that Rubber Soul -- which marked their transition from an increasingly banal and almost irrelevant pop band into a group which became adult, confident and inventive -- is currently the most ignored in their catalogue. But before making the case for Rubber Soul it is instructive to look at the... > Read more

The Beatles: The Word

Mink De Ville: Return to Magenta (1978)

24 Aug 2009  |  5 min read  |  4

The curious things about the life of Willy De Ville was not that he succumbed to pancreatic cancer in early August 2009, but that he had lived so long. He was 58 when he died -- but from the time he appeared on the post-punk New Wave scene in New York in the early Eighties he seemed to be destined for a short but bright flight. He was junkie, his first wife would pull a knife on rock... > Read more

Mink De Ville: Just Your Friends

Various: Cuba, I Am Time (1999)

22 Jun 2009  |  4 min read

When any art form has success, especially if it is unexpected, you can expect the ripples for a long time afterwards . . . and like ripples when a stone is thrown in a flat pond, they are of diminishing impact. So when Gladiator had phenomenal success you didn’t have to wait long for a slew of increasingly bad sword’n’sandal epics. And when the Buena Vista Social... > Read more

Clave y Guaguanco: La Voz del Congo

Public Enemy: It Takes A Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (1988)

7 Jun 2009  |  3 min read  |  1

By the late Eighties when this announced itself like a live album with stadium sound from the audience and a siren wail, hip-hop had sprung past the sampling innocence and good times of its early period in Stateside inner-city block parties and cheap steals from bits of vinyl. Within the first few minutes of this confrontational, sometimes annoying but often brilliant album, the global... > Read more

Public Enemy: Show 'Em What You Got

Mike Nock/Frank Gibson: Open Door (1987)

6 May 2009  |  2 min read  |  1

When expat pianist/composer Mike Nock and Auckland-based drummer Frank Gibson got together in '87 to record these duets both men were at interesting points in their respective but separate careers, but neither had played together much. Their sole recording together released prior to these sessions -- they had played on some Radio New Zealand programmes together with bassist Andy Brown --... > Read more

Mick Nock/Frank Gibson: Phaedra's Lullaby